Posts tagged ‘contraception’

September 15, 2012

Daily Scoop: Why judges are dismantling the GOP agenda

A year after Wisconsin exploded in protest over Republican legislation to gut collective bargaining for public employees, a Wisconsin judge has nullified the law, ruling on Friday that it violates workers’ equal rights under the Constitution.

Those dramatic union reforms and the political theater it sparked last year turned Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker into a Republican hero and helped balance the state’s budget.

With its focus on a signature Republican law, Friday’s ruling also highlights a series of state and federal rulings over the last year that have turned back major tenets of a Republican agenda fueled by the massive electoral victories the party brought home in November 2010, when it took over the House of Representatives and won nine governorships.

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April 16, 2012

Rosen, Romney & a Little Perspective

Anyone who pays attention to American politics has by now heard of the comment made by Hilary Rosen about Ann Romney never working a day in her life. Of course this erupted into a controversy given Rosen’s status as a Democratic pundit and strategist. Judging from the reactions, especially from the Right who are downright giddy over the whole thing, there is a need for some contextual perspective and maybe even a few facts.  

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March 23, 2012

Free contraception or just getting your money’s worth?

Much has been made over the contraception mandate rules implemented as part of the Affordable Care Act with many conservative commentators asking why the public should pay for others to have sex.  Along with the fallacious characterization of contraception use the controversy’s liberal use of the word “free” in conjunction with it introduces a whole other question. Are the proponents of these provisions really demanding free services or are they just looking to get their money’s worth?

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March 6, 2012

The Daily Scoop: How the Catholic Church almost accepted birth control

There is something truly baffling about the 2012 presidential candidates hotly debating Planned Parenthood and birth control. These battles were fought — and won — half a century ago. At that time, the vast majority of Americans, nearly all mainstream religious organizations and leaders in both political parties accepted contraception as beneficial to families, society and the world.

The move toward mainstream acceptance of contraception began in the early 20th century and accelerated in the 1940s. In 1942, the Birth Control Federation of America changed its name to the Planned Parenthood Federation of America. Abraham Stone explained at the time that “planned parenthood” signaled “the need for individual couples to plan their families and for nations to plan their populations.”

As the birth control movement became mainstream, it still took several years for the nation’s leaders to endorse it. In 1959, President Dwight D. Eisenhower declared: “I cannot imagine anything more emphatically a subject that is not a proper political or government activity or function or responsibility. . . .

Just a few years later, President John F. Kennedy — a Democrat and the nation’s first Catholic president — supported family-planning programs as part of foreign aid. Even Eisenhower, JFK’s Republican predecessor, eventually came around, admitting in the mid-1960s: “Once as President, I thought and said that birth control was not the business of our federal government. The facts changed my mind. . . . Governments must act. . . . Failure would limit the expectations of future generations to abject poverty and suffering and bring down upon us history’s condemnation.”

For the next two decades, every American president promoted contraception as an essential part of domestic and foreign policy. Even the Catholic Church considered lifting its prohibition on contraception — and almost did.
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February 21, 2012

The Daily Scoop: Birth control as election issue? Why?

“The way the American democratic system works is very peculiar,” says [D.G.] Hart, who teaches history at Hillsdale College in Michigan.

“But I don’t know that this [election cycle] is any worse than any other period when religious and racial preferences were expressed as cultural preference,” when a presidential election becomes an even more pointed referendum on what kind of society we want to construct.

He notes a disconnect among Republican voters between what the law currently requires and permits and “what people think Obama is requiring, and their perceptions go a long way to motivating them. You might think we would be better, and it is surprising that these cultural matters keep coming up this way.
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February 8, 2012

The Daily Scoop: Teen Pregnancy, Contraception & Religious Perceptions

Once again the Daily Scoop is offering multiple interrelated articles. Today, we are looking at 3 articles that examine the current controversies circling around the Health and Human Services rules for contraception provisions inclusion in employer insurance policies, including religious-based universities and hospitals but exempting churches.

The first article details the findings of newly released study which illustrates the effect of increased contraception use among teens and the decrease in abortion and pregnancy rates for the same groups. The second compares perceptions of the contraception “battle” in the media, in Congress and the general public. And the third reports on the current actions the House of Representatives is preparing to take on the contraception rules.

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January 25, 2012

The Daily Scoop: 2 Studies – Global Abortion Rates & Teen Pregnancy

Today, the Daily Scoop includes two studies that illustrate the overall need for increased education, awareness and availability of contraception. The first article compares abortion frequencies and related health impacts from countries with abortion bans and little to no family planning & contraception education versus those where abortion is legal and family planning is available.

The second discusses recent CDC study findings which illuminates general misconceptions of contraception and possibilities of becoming pregnant on the part of teen mothers.

Abortions Are More Common in Countries that Outlaw Them

Abortion rates are higher in countries where the procedure is illegal and  nearly half of all abortions worldwide are unsafe, with the vast majority in  developing countries, a new study concludes.

Experts couldn’t say whether more liberal laws led to fewer procedures, but  said good access to birth control in those countries resulted in fewer unwanted  pregnancies.

The global abortion rate remained virtually unchanged from 2003 to 2008, at  about 28 abortions per 1,000 women aged 15 to 44, a total of about 43.8 million  abortions, according to the study. The rate had previously been dropping since  1995.

About 47,000 women died from unsafe abortions in 2008, and another 8.5  million women had serious medical complications. Almost all unsafe abortions  were in developing countries, where family planning and contraceptive programs  have mostly levelled off.

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CDC: Many teen moms didn’t think it could happen

ATLANTA (AP) — A new government study suggests a lot of teenage girls are clueless about their chances of getting pregnant.

In a survey of thousands of teenage mothers who had unintended pregnancies, about a third who didn’t use birth control said the reason was they didn’t believe they could pregnant.
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